Joseph Smith

From "Inner city" 1

From “Inner city” 1From "Inner city" 2From “Inner city” 2From "The Loves of the Poets" 1

From “The Loves of the Poets” 1From "The Loves of the Poets" 2

From “The Loves of the Poets” 2From "The Loves of the Poets" 3

From “The Loves of the Poets” 3From "The Loves of the Poets" 4

From “The Loves of the Poets” 4From "The Loves of the Poets" 5

From “The Loves of the Poets” 5The act of Weeping, 2012

The act of Weeping, 2012the Bone Heads, 2012

the Bone Heads, 2012The Callous Woman, 2011

The Callous Woman, 2011The Easter Bonnet , 2011

The Easter Bonnet , 2011The Externalization of Guilt 2012

The Externalization of Guilt 2012The frog in the Princess I, 2012

The frog in the Princess I, 2012The melancholiac I, 2012

The melancholiac I, 2012The Raw Deal, 2012

The Raw Deal, 2012The smoke that gets in your eye, 2012The smoke that gets in your eye, 2012The Styptic I, 2012

The Styptic I, 2012Untitled #181 (head, water & fire, detail), 1988

Untitled #181 (head, water & fire, detail), 1988

More information on Joseph Smith:

http://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/articles/25890/camera-obscura

 

Karl Wilhelm Diefenbach

coastal-landscape-capri-iCoastal Landscape Capri1901-seagull-in-front-of-the-cliffs-of-capriSeagull in front of the Cliffs of Capriview-of-the-coast-of-capriView of the coast of CapritoteninselToteninselto-the-rescueTo the rescuethe-great-sphinx-of-gizaThe Great Sphinx of Giza

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Karl Wilhelm Diefenbach was a German Symbolist painter and radical social reformer. He attended the Munich Academy of Art and was deeply inspired by the works of fellow symbolist Swiss painter Arnold Bocklin. Diefenbach was a natural medicine practitioner living a nature-centered existence and mainly vegetarian, an oddity at this time. His lifestyle rejected many social norms of the age including religion which among other issues forced him for a time to flee to Egypt. This relocation saw his work focus of the ancient ruins and temples of that land. As a painter he is an independent representative of Art Nouveau and Symbolism. He spent his later years on the Island of Capri painting the rocky coast. Diefenbach’s life was as storied as his work and both paint a dramatic and original landscape.

sea-nymphs-in-grotta-minervaSea-nymphs in Grotta Minervalanscaspe-capriLanscaspe Capri

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Costa-Caprese

blue-grottoBlue grotto Caprian-allegory-of-lost-loveAn allegory of lost love

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Magdalena Abakanowicz

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Magdalena Abakanowicz (Polish, b.1930) is best known for her textile sculptures of biomorphic forms. At the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts she studied drawing and painting in the Socialist Realist style, as well as textile design, screen printing, and fiber design. Her early work includes a series of gouaches and watercolors on linen sheets, which depict imaginary plants and animals. After she graduated, the Polish government was less strict about the form and content of art, and artists were allowed to travel to Western cities. Abakanowicz was particularly influenced by the geometric structures of Constructivist art. Her series Abakans, begun in 1967, are giant sculptures, woven from a variety of fibers, that hang a few inches off the ground.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Abakanowicz made several series of anthropomorphic textile sculptures. Backs (1976–1980) was a series of 80 versions of the human trunk made from burlap and resin, and Embryology (1978–1980) consisted of approximately 800 round forms of various sizes, made from burlap, gauze, and hemp. These organic sculptures examine the role of individual creativity within the crowd. In the late 1980s and 1990s, Abakanowicz produced sculptures in bronze, wood, stone, and clay, including her Bronze Crowd (1990) and Puellae (1992) series. For the War Games series, begun in 1987, Abakanowicz stripped off the bark of trees that were abandoned by foresters near Warsaw, and remodeled each trunk with metal parts. This series represents her life-long interest in nature, dismemberment, and regeneration.

mammal-headMammal Headmagdalena-abakanowiczCrowdplecyPlecyred-albakanRed Albakanfour-seated-figuresFour seated figuresfour-on-a-benchFour on a Benchgrey-albakanGrey Albakanklatka-i-plecyKlatka i plecythe-group-of-sevenThe Group of Seven

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson

Aeneas Sacrificing to Neptune  1827.

Aeneas Sacrificing to Neptune 1827.

Aurore C1812

Aurore C1812

Jupiter and Callisto 1820

Aeneas Sacrificing to Neptune 1827.

La Mise au tombeau d'Atala 1808

La Mise au tombeau d’Atala 1808

Le Combat 1814

Le Combat 1814

Le deluge 1806

Le deluge 1806

Mademoiselle Lange as Venus 1798

Mademoiselle Lange as Venus 1798

Mademoiselle Lange en Danaé, 1799

Mademoiselle Lange en Danaé, 1799

Orphee et Eurydice 1827

Orphee et Eurydice 1827

Psyché endormie, 1807

Psyché endormie, 1807

Phaedra Rejecting the Embraces of Theseus

Phaedra Rejecting the Embraces of Theseus 1800

 

Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson(1767-1824)
After his father’s death in 1784, Anne-Louis Girodet de Roucy-Trioson joined the studio of Neoclassical titan Jacques-Louis David yet became a pioneer of French Romanticism. He won the Prix de Rome in 1789. Girodet’s Endymion Sleeping, painted in Rome and submitted to the Salon of 1793, showed the influence of Italian artists Antonio Canova and Correggio. Because Girodet’s paintings were coldly sensuous and atmospheric, rather than spartan and heroic like David’s, David disapproved. Girodet soon returned to Paris, where he earned his living by drawing illustrations and painting portraits. Although he scandalized the 1799 Salon with satirical sexual references in his portrait of a courtesan with her protector, Napoleon I nonetheless honored him with commissions. In 1810 Girodet won an important competition, beating out David’s famous masterpiece The Intervention of the Sabine Women.

A contemporary critic viewing Burial of Atalaof 1808 described Girodet’s style as having a “precision of drawing reminiscent of the masterpieces of antiquity, a fresh coloring, a studied effect, and a brush stroke at once generous, fluent, and delicate.” The picture won the Légion d’Honneur. In 1812 Girodet inherited a fortune, painted less, and dedicated himself increasingly to writing tedious poems on aesthetics in a house shuttered to daylight.

Pygmalion and Galatea 1814

Pygmalion and Galatea 1814

The Death of Hippolytus c1810

The Death of Hippolytus c1810

Sleeping Bacchus 1790

Sleeping Bacchus 1790

The Sleep of Endymion 1791

The Sleep of Endymion 1791

Cephalus and Aurora 1810

Cephalus and Aurora 1810

The Birth of Venus 1810

The Birth of Venus 1810

Miroslav Tichy…

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Born in Moravia in 1926, Tichý studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts (SVU) in Prague in the years immediately following the SecondWorldWar. After Czechoslovakia’s adoption of communism in 1948, he left the Academy and turned his back on the official art world, withdrawing from mainstream society, in part as a political response to the social and cultural repressions of the regime. Regarded as a talented painter and draftsman influenced by Picasso and the German Expressionists, Tichý did not agree with the prevailing socialistrealismoftheday, instead formingan artist collective knownastheBrněnskáPětka (Brno Five) with other likeminded SVU alumni. Constantly threatened and watched by the regime, the group took great risk in producing their work, even holding a clandestine exhibition in the Kyjov hospital in 1956. Tichý benefitted from the small, yet vibrant, cultural scene of Kyjov, taking in dance performances, plays, and beginning his first photographic experimentations with the artist Ladislav Víšek. Prone to mental breakdowns since his youth,Tichý worked alongside his peers until an apparen tpsychotic episode justbefor ea planned exhibitionin1957 from which he withdrew his images. His work was not exhibited again until nearly four decades later. Over the years, his deliberately nonconformist lifestyle—as well as his mental illness—landed him in trouble with the authorities and led to periods of confinement in psychiatric institutions and the loss of his studio in 1972.

Living in near isolation in his hometown of Kyjov, Tichý conceived a world populated by images of the local women, taking thousands of photographs from the 1960s through the late 1980s. Though he never stopped producing paintings and drawings, Tichý focused the majority of his attention on the photographic medium, practically reinventing it to suit his artistic vision of capturing the feminine essence with light. Save for the film, chemicals, and photographic paper he bought from a nearby drugstore, all his photographic equipment was self-made. Using cameras inventively constructed from found materials—shoeboxes, tin cans, clothing elastic, toilet paper rolls, even cigarette boxes—Tichý obsessively returns to the subject of the female form, whether viewed from afar with his makeshift telephoto lenses, or captured from the television screen. His intuitive method of photographing during daily walks about town might appear amateur in ambition, but the intensity, frequency, and regularity with which he creates reveal a unique and distinctly personal style of photography. Despite his camera’s crude optics—the lenses were cut from Plexiglas polished with sandpaper, toothpaste, and ashes—and skewed framing, the resulting images are formally complex, reflective of Tichý’s early art training, and vaguely reminiscent of the early works of the classical pictorial tradition. His images of women—often in bathing suits, bare-legged, or simply walking about town—are subtly erotic, taken from afar, often without the knowledge of the subjects. Tichý often embellished the surfaces and borders of these scratched, blurred, torn, and spotted images by drawing directly on them in pen or pencil, heightening the expressive quality created by his imperfect equipment. Sometimes framed or mounted on newspaper or cardboard, these highly personal objects were created for his own viewing pleasure, each negative printed only once with a homemade enlarger.

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Miroslav Tichy

camera

Miroslav Tichy’s camera

Magdalena Abakanowicz

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Magdalena Abakanowicz (Polish, b.1930) is best known for her textile sculptures of biomorphic forms. At the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts she studied drawing and painting in the Socialist Realist style, as well as textile design, screen printing, and fiber design. Her early work includes a series of gouaches and watercolors on linen sheets, which depict imaginary plants and animals. After she graduated, the Polish government was less strict about the form and content of art, and artists were allowed to travel to Western cities. Abakanowicz was particularly influenced by the geometric structures of Constructivist art. Her series Abakans, begun in 1967, are giant sculptures, woven from a variety of fibers, that hang a few inches off the ground.

 

During the 1970s and 1980s, Abakanowicz made several series of anthropomorphic textile sculptures. Backs (1976–1980) was a series of 80 versions of the human trunk made from burlap and resin, and Embryology (1978–1980) consisted of approximately 800 round forms of various sizes, made from burlap, gauze, and hemp. These organic sculptures examine the role of individual creativity within the crowd. In the late 1980s and 1990s, Abakanowicz produced sculptures in bronze, wood, stone, and clay, including her Bronze Crowd (1990) and Puellae (1992) series. For the War Games series, begun in 1987, Abakanowicz stripped off the bark of trees that were abandoned by foresters near Warsaw, and remodeled each trunk with metal parts. This series represents her life-long interest in nature, dismemberment, and regeneration.

Grey AlbakanGrey Albakan

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